The Sum is Greater

Backed by the power of your generosity, our faculty and students are engaged in significant work and study that impact our community, our state, and the world around us. Here is just a sample of stories that highlight your dollars at work: Costellos Light Up the Byrd Polar Research Center, CBEC Building Milestone, Eye on the Sky, and A Piece of History.


Last autumn, Ohio State kicked off the $2.5 billion But for Ohio State capital campaign. Each area of the university takes initiative to raise a share, and the College of Arts and Sciences is dedicated to raising $200 million. We wanted to highlight a few of the fantastic gifts that have been made and some updates on major projects that support our campaign initiatives and our ascent from academic excellence to eminence. The college has identified key fundraising priorities—you can view the complete overview brochure at go.osu.edu/campaign-priorities.

1) PLACE STUDENTS FIRST — $40 million
Students, both undergraduate and graduate, are the heart of the college’s strength. A key focus of the campaign will be to increase funding to recruit and retain talented students from Ohio and around the world who are focused, competitive, and who welcome challenges.

2) ELEVATE FACULTY AND THE ACADEMIC ENTERPRISE — $48 million
The campaign will have a major impact on our ability to recruit and retain preeminent faculty members, as well as invest in targeted programs that reach across traditional boundaries of teaching and research.

3) CREATE MODERN LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS — $47 million
The creation of new and renovation of existing spaces for our students and faculty to conduct research, teach and learn, and congregate is critical to the continued success of the college. From projects like renovating Sullivant Hall and vastly improving spaces for arts programs to building a new, state-of-the-art chemistry building, our facilities must be improved to keep pace with students and faculty on campus.

4) EMBOLDEN THE RESEARCH AGENDA — $55 million
With more than 40 world-class research centers and institutes that cover the full range of the arts and sciences, opportunities exist to support the research efforts of leading faculty as well as new and mid-career faculty.

5) DRIVE HIGH-IMPACT INNOVATION — $10 million
The true strength of a robust College of Arts and Sciences is the ability to drive innovation in teaching, outreach, and research. This will include selective investment in interdisciplinary programs and research, which will help set the path for future discoveries.

The creation of new and renovation of existing spaces for our faculty, scientists, and students to conduct research, teach and learn, and congregate is critical to the continued success of the College of Arts and Sciences.


COSTELLOS LIGHT UP THE BYRD POLAR RESEARCH CENTER

Dennis CostelloAlumnus DENNIS COSTELLO (MA, economics, 1973) and his wife, Kathryn, donated LED lighting to Ohio State’s Byrd Polar Research Center, transforming one of the most precious research and storage spaces on the Ohio State campus—and perhaps in the world.

“The Byrd Polar Research Center has amassed one of the largest archives of prehistoric ice core samples and the most extensive archive of tropical ice core samples in the world,” said Ellen Mosley-Thompson, geography, director of the center and Distinguished University Professor.  

For the last four decades, Mosley-Thompson, along with her husband and research partner, Lonnie Thompson, earth sciences, Distinguished University Professor and Byrd Polar senior research scientist, have been collecting ice cores from Earth’s polar ice sheets and highest tropical peaks, storing them at minus 30ºF in two large freezers at Scott Hall on Ohio State’s west campus. Until recently, the facility was dim and poorly illuminated by inefficient incandescent bulbs.

However, that all changed when Costello, managing partner for Braemar Energy Ventures, a company dedicated exclusively to energy development, visited the Thompsons and took his first-ever tour of the storage units. Costello has more than 30 years of experience in the energy and venture capital industries.

He began his career in alternative energy with positions as a project manager at Midwest Research Institute and was a member of the original staff of the National Solar Energy Research Institute, now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

“Dennis is a passionate advocate for the environment and for alternative energy,” said Mosley-Thompson. “Within days of his visit he called and offered to purchase and pay for the installation of new lighting fixtures in both freezers and the three cold-work rooms at Byrd Polar.”

The Costellos’ gift included replacing all 120W Halogens with 40W LED Surface Wraps, resulting in a 90 percent energy reduction with 100 percent improved light levels. The LED lighting was produced and installed by Albeo Technologies, an energy company launched with the help of Braemar Energy Ventures and the first company to bring the advantages of energy efficient LED lighting to the industrial and commercial marketplace.

“I am deeply honored to be able to provide a gift that will illuminate and showcase one of the most impressive libraries of Earth’s climate history,” said Costello.


The Thompsons show off an ice core in one of the newly illuminated freezers at the Byrd Polar Research Center.

From projects like renovating Sullivant Hall and vastly improving spaces for arts programs to building a new, state-of-the-art chemistry building, our facilities must be improved to keep pace with students and faculty on campus.

CBEC BUILDING MILESTONE

CBEC

A cheering group of faculty, students, and alumni celebrated a milestone in early March. The “topping-out” of the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Chemistry (CBEC) Building signaled the completion of an important phase of its construction. CBEC, scheduled to open in 2014, is designed to provide a stunning backdrop to meet the challenges of science today and tomorrow.

The LEED*-certified facility will accommodate a community of scientists, engineers, postdoctoral fellows, undergraduate and graduate students, and technical staff working collaboratively in the critical areas of nano/bioscience and technology; energy-related materials; energy and the environment; and theory, modeling, and simulations. Research teams will benefit from laboratories that have open, connective space to promote a comprehensive interdisciplinary research enterprise.


*Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

EYE ON THE SKY

David PriceGood news for Star Show fans. Ohio State’s planetarium is expected to reopen this fall. A recent $100,000 gift from DAVID PRICE (pictured at left with Executive Dean Steinmetz), longtime friend of the astronomy department and member of the ASC Advisory Committee, is more good news.   

Bradley Peterson, astronomy professor and chair, said, “This generous gift from David Price provides a cornerstone for our new programs in public education and outreach and for exciting new opportunities for our general education courses. A visit to this spectacular new facility will be an event people will remember.”  

Astronomy graduate students Kate Grier, Calen Henderson, Rebecca Stoll, Jill Gerke, and Courtney Epstein run the Planetarium programs. They have trained and practiced using the new Spitz SciDome XD equipment. They’re ready to start the show.


Ohio State is one of only four institutions in the nation to install the XD, which uses two projectors to display 2560x2560 pixels (that’s over 6.5 million) onto the planetarium dome.

Students, both undergraduate and graduate, are the heart of the college’s strength. A key focus of the campaign will be to increase funding to establish a comprehensive program to provide international educational opportunities for students.

A PIECE OF HISTORY

In January, 19 undergraduate students embarked on a journey beginning in classrooms around campus and ending in May at the Berlin Wall. The Department of History’s new interdisciplinary undergraduate World War II Study Abroad Program supports Ohio State’s motto: disciplina in civitatem (education for citizenship).

This exceptional educational experience for both history and non-history majors combines four academic courses with a three-week tour of European battle sites, memorials, and museums. Students from across campus competed to take part in this life-changing experience, which was made possible by generous gifts to the World War II Scholarship Fund in History.

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