Racial Discourses on U.S.-Mexico Border Region Indigenous Identities and Rights

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Christina Leza
November 4, 2022
2:20PM - 3:40PM
Location
Virtual

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-11-04 14:20:00 2022-11-04 15:40:00 Racial Discourses on U.S.-Mexico Border Region Indigenous Identities and Rights The Department of Spanish and Portuguese will host Christina Leza, PhD, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Colorado College, on CarmenZoom for a talk on her work on racial discourses on the U.S-Mexico border region and indigenous identities and rights. About the talk "In the United States, U.S. citizenship and a high degree of “Indian blood” are significant aspects of the mainstream schema for conceptualizing Indigenous or “Native American” identity. This talk addresses how common and widely circulating discourses on Indigenous peoples and Latin American immigrants in the U.S. shape perceptions about and lived realities of Indigenous peoples whose homelands are divided by the U.S.-Mexico border. It is argued that conflations of race, nationality and (in)authentic indigeneity in such discourses undermine the ancestral connections and territorial rights of Indigenous peoples at the border. The talk further addresses how popular beliefs about the nature of racism that frame non-Indigenous interpretations of Indigenous issues results in condemnation and erasure of intra-Indigenous racism in ways that reproduce White racism towards Indigenous peoples." Event details and registration Virtual College of Arts and Sciences asccomm@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

The Department of Spanish and Portuguese will host Christina Leza, PhD, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Colorado College, on CarmenZoom for a talk on her work on racial discourses on the U.S-Mexico border region and indigenous identities and rights.

About the talk

"In the United States, U.S. citizenship and a high degree of “Indian blood” are significant aspects of the mainstream schema for conceptualizing Indigenous or “Native American” identity. This talk addresses how common and widely circulating discourses on Indigenous peoples and Latin American immigrants in the U.S. shape perceptions about and lived realities of Indigenous peoples whose homelands are divided by the U.S.-Mexico border. It is argued that conflations of race, nationality and (in)authentic indigeneity in such discourses undermine the ancestral connections and territorial rights of Indigenous peoples at the border. The talk further addresses how popular beliefs about the nature of racism that frame non-Indigenous interpretations of Indigenous issues results in condemnation and erasure of intra-Indigenous racism in ways that reproduce White racism towards Indigenous peoples."

Event details and registration

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